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Shakshuka - Eggs Poached in a Tomato Stew

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Source: Chelsea - Victae.com


Serves
4
Prep
10 minutes
Cook
45 minutes

Shakshuka is the fancy name for a one-skillet dish of eggs poached in a tomato stew or sauce.  While shakshuka originated in North Africa, it is now a breakfast favorite in Israel.  While you can certainly wow your friends and family at a weekend breakfast or brunch, I prefer to make it as an easy weeknight dinner.  Shakshuka is warm and comforting at the end of a workday. Serve with crusty bread, or my favorite way, over brown rice with a drizzle of good olive oil!


Ingredients


What (your ingredients):


1 tablespoon avocado oil


2 shallots, thinly sliced


1 zucchini, diced small


1 yellow squash, diced small


1 bell pepper, diced small


5-6 Roma tomatoes, diced small


1 head of kale, roughly chopped


 Salt


1 clove garlic, minced


1 teaspoon cumin


1 15-oz. can tomato sauce


½ cup water


 


4 eggs


Directions


How (your directions):


In a medium cast-iron skillet, heat oil over medium heat.  Add shallots and cook 3-4 minutes until translucent.


Add diced zucchini, squash, pepper, tomatoes, kale, and salt.  Sauté for 5 minutes until vegetables begin to brown slightly.


Add garlic and cumin and sauté for 1 minute.


Add tomato sauce and ½ cup water, then simmer for 10-15 minutes.


Using the back of a wooden spoon (or just a spoon or ladle), create four wells for the eggs.


Crack an egg carefully to keep the yolk intact and gently allow egg to slip into one of the wells.


Repeat for remaining three eggs.


Cover and allow to simmer until eggs are cooked to desired doneness (about 10 minutes).


Serve hot over brown rice with a drizzle of good olive oil and a sprinkle of salt!


 


Why (the science):  You may know that tomatoes are rich in lycopene, which is protective against prostate cancer, but did you know that the more processed the tomato is, the more lycopene there is?  Canned tomato sauce and tomato paste have a higher lycopene content than raw tomatoes!


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